Anti-Social

Mayoral Primary: Joe Rasco

June 25, 2022 Tony Winton & Thom Mozloom Season 5 Episode 10
Anti-Social
Mayoral Primary: Joe Rasco
Show Notes Transcript

Joe Rasco was the former mayor. Now he wants his old job back. What are his positions on financing up to $250 million of upcoming sea level rise projects and many other big issues facing the barrier island of Key Biscayne. 

The primary is Aug. 23, but ballots will be mailed July 21. This is an interview you won't want to miss. 


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Tony Winton:

again will always be my friend live from Key Biscayne, Florida. This is antisocial, the program where we look at social media and call balls and strikes or at least we try to. I'm Tony Winton.

Thom Mozloom:

I'm Thomas loom live from the comfort suite studios somewhere in Florida. And that's exactly what we're doing up here. Tony, we're calling balls and strikes. I'm I'm with a travel team following my rising 17 year old superstar baseball player around all Florida watching him hammer the competition.

Tony Winton:

And that's why I said balls and strikes. And how are the balls or strikes being called up there somewhere in Central Florida.

Thom Mozloom:

Today was a miserable game. I know that the umpire did the best he could. He did not wake up this morning and say I'm going to screw up this game. And so I'm really hoping and encouraging him to have a short memory he'll do better tomorrow.

Tony Winton:

Nice thing about baseball is you know you there's always another game tomorrow and when that's correct. And then there's always next season, right?

Thom Mozloom:

Yes, this is the never a never ending travel ball season. It's it's kind of fun. But it's interesting. Being away from South Florida, particularly keep a skein while all of this news is breaking left and right. And listening to the reactions of people who I don't live with. It's been it's been pretty interesting.

Tony Winton:

It is. And we'll have a short discussion at the end of the show. Because we have a really important guest as part of a series that we're doing because speaking of seasons, this is political season in Key Biscayne. And it's starting a bit early because we have a primary for the office of Mayor and I believe that our guest actually was the gentleman who was in the last primary a long, long time ago, not not quite as long ago at Star Wars, but kind of like episode at least episode two of keep skate. So Joe Rascoe, the former mayor, former member of the council and our guest here on antisocial.

Joe Rasco:

Good afternoon, Tony and Tom. Glad to be here. Thanks for inviting me.

Unknown:

It's great to have you, Joe. Is that true? You are the last primary purveyor. Yes, indeed. So this, this is all your fault then? Something like that. 100% of the time you run for mayor, there's a primary.

Tony Winton:

That's that's a pretty interesting correlation.

Thom Mozloom:

Yeah, yeah. So, I mean, obviously, the first question is going to be why you were mayor, you know, what the job entails? You've seen the ups and downs. And, and yet, after a layoff, you've said you know, what I want to do is I want to be mayor again. Why is that?

Joe Rasco:

Why is that? Okay, so, um, let me give you a little bit of background. Before I jump right into that. I love Key Biscayne. I'm passionate about Key Biscayne. I've been living here for 44 years, married my wife Anna, and we decided to live on Key Biscayne. We also bought a condo. And this is the place where I've raised my three children. It's been a very important happy place for us. My My wife is very also very much involved in the community. She was a teacher at the Key Biscayne Elementary. And then she came back as principal so she she was also a principal and made that an A plus school. So they were very much ingrained in the community. It was something that we always wanted to do. And we did and I've got decades of service to this community by having been involved in a lot of volunteer things such as Little League, and you mentioned baseball, Little League, and that led me to getting involved with the incorporation movement, which as everyone knows, was the separation between Miami Dade County and the village of Key Biscayne that we created.

Thom Mozloom:

Those of us on the mainland refer to it as the great divorce but okay, you know, you call it What you will?

Joe Rasco:

Yeah, so, um, these things that I was involved in Tony and Tom over the last 30 years, okay. And I, like I said decades of service to the my community. And now we come to some new challenges. And at this time, I'm looking at these challenges, such as the bear code bridge and the Rickenbacker causeway. street flooding is a challenge that we need to look at along with sea level rise. The traffic, the circulation of traffic within our city, especially on cram Boulevard is something that has to be addressed. As I was talking about before, my love for these educational institutions, we have to make sure that we are getting our students to be the best that they can be with the K to eight public school and also mast.

Tony Winton:

Let's get into that a little bit. First off you you you said Tom was asking you why you're running for mayor, you also had your hat in the ring. Not that long ago for manager. You are in the round of competition, right with that eventually wound up with a selection of Aundrea Agha, do you feel like this is like, Okay, I didn't get to be manager. So I'm going to try one let one last shot.

Joe Rasco:

No, it's simply my desire to serve my community

Tony Winton:

Okay. Let's let's talk about resiliency. The there again. was a divisive ballot question in 2020. Passed 60/40. Most residents voting in favor of the ability of the village council to borrow 100 million dollars no borrowings taken place. No. But now there's another issue. And you're very familiar with it, because we had you on as a guest with the charter review Commission. And that issue is about raising the debt cap. So I guess the question is, you know, it could be, you know, perhaps, you know, a lot more than $100 million, depending on, you know, what the manager saying it could be $250 million. So, where are you on the debt cap issue, but what what's your what's your, what's your position on that?

Joe Rasco:

Okay, so number one, as part of this charter revision committee, what you do is you look at things over a long period of time, and you say, do we have the right tools in the toolbox? And I think that that's what our group did, and said, hey, hey, you know, we knew we need to look at this 1% We need to see whether this is the right tool at the right time. And that's the kind of things that we came up with. It's one of the ones that I like very much is okay, you come up to the debt cap, and then you have an election. And I think that's a fantastic idea. If the debt cap becomes a problem, as you know, Tony, because you've researched this, obviously, we're about the only place that has a debt cap and all of the municipalities in Miami Dade County,

Tony Winton:

certainly the only barrier island that has one

Joe Rasco:

yes. And so it is something that we put in the charter, I'm happy to and we left it there, as you know, because you cover this our proceedings, and we left it in there, because we wanted to respect what the voters have put in. So going forward, I think that will present this, by the way, not in the primary, this is going to be in the

Tony Winton:

November ballot.

Joe Rasco:

Right. So this is something that the people need to look at and get ready to vote,

Tony Winton:

how are you voting?

Joe Rasco:

I'm gonna vote for just about all of these measures and ballots. And, um, you know, I think this is the right thing to do.

Thom Mozloom:

Right. Do you do you think do you think that you're tied to them, though? I mean, you were on the commission, we should have brought this up at the the last time you were on the show is Do you feel that voters are going to look at all of these new ballot measures and say, This is the Rascoe agenda. This is what we're voting for. If not like Joe, we're gonna vote for this

Joe Rasco:

right now. Not the least bit. I have the pride of authorship. It stands with everyone that was on that committee. And we felt in a very unanimous way for their very different folks on that on that committee. And everyone agreed that hey, we should offer these up so that the people can look at him and and see if they agree with us, okay.

Tony Winton:

In terms of how it leads to the overall amount of spending, though, it's the beginning of a long could be very expensive road manager saying could be $250 million total. And I understand that there could be offsetting money income from the feds and the state. Perhaps it's 40%. Maybe it's more but 50% 60%. But at any rate, it's going to be a large local municipal expense, the same time, the Property Appraiser you're in Dade County gave Key Biscayne I guess you could call it good news in 8.8% increase in the tax base, which means that if rates stay the same, then there's going to be roughly an 8.8% On average tax increase in property taxes. Now, of course, people have exemptions, and it's different property by property. We understand all that. But on average, you're looking at a pretty big, pretty big increase. What do you think about that? I mean, the key the the first budget hearing, I think, is next week?

Joe Rasco:

Yes, it's coming up on the June 28. I think that we have an opportunity to look at the budget, get through the process, see what the impact of inflation is on our budget. But certainly with an 8.8% increase, I think that there should be room for us to lower the millage and to keep our taxes more or less in the same neighborhood.

Tony Winton:

What but isn't that really difficult, though? I mean, you have inflation running actually higher than 8.8%. So you've got you've got some costs that are that are most of your costs or labor costs. They're limited by collective bargaining agreements yet about 4%. It's at 4%. Village financial officer already saying contractors are really hitting us hard. I mean, is that is that you're putting yourself in a box is what I'm saying, given the inflationary environment that not just keep his game, but really everyone has to deal with?

Joe Rasco:

Well, no, Tony, I think, again, we go through a budget process, okay. And that looks at what the needs are, what the needs are of our departments, whether it be the fire department, or the police department. And the job of those city council, folks is to give us a good review of what it is that is required to get us to top level services.

Thom Mozloom:

More than just the services. Joe, I think one of the things that Tony is driving it, and I'm gonna be more blunt about it is the idea of borrowing $250 million now is significantly different than borrowing $250 million, even a year ago, it's a lot more expensive money. Are you concerned that these projects are going to hit at the most expensive lending period? Is there any wisdom in pushing off as far as you can in hopes that money gets cheaper?

Joe Rasco:

Yes, that could be a tactic that will be used. But But, Tom, you're assuming that that number is correct, we don't really know. And as you

Thom Mozloom:

actually think it's much higher.

Joe Rasco:

But each project, as you know, requires a supermajority vote. Okay. And also another thing that you haven't raised so far, is there are lending institutions that are involved here? And should we go too far afield? Those lending institutions aren't gonna lend you the money? And if they do, they're gonna lend yet I've had rates that don't make sense. So we have the ability to control that spending, as we go through this process. And And yes, there are projects that we need to do there that could be beyond the 100 million dollar bond, but we're gonna go through this, we're gonna go and take each project and look at them, and then and fund those projects. That's how it was set up

Tony Winton:

if you had to prioritize, because that may be a choice. Okay. He was Mayor are going to have to fashion a consensus with whoever else is elected. And they're going to be changes possibly to the council. We don't know the status of several the incumbent. So that's correct. And they haven't they haven't publicly announced. But it could be some changes. What would you prioritize? Would you say that drainage and flooding is number one, and maybe undergrounding? Like to do it, but we may not do that? Let FPL do what they legally have to do and not because that's an additional expense. What would you would you would, how would you prioritize things?

Joe Rasco:

Tony, you you've exactly walked through the process that I would go through and for me, I named them as one of my five things was street flooding, and looking at sea level rise and how that's going to continue to affect our stormwater system. That to me is a very important objective that we need to consider when I'm become mayor.

Tony Winton:

I think Tom had a question.

Thom Mozloom:

Sure. There's no secret that on Key Biscayne there. While these are non partisan elections, there seems to be political factions on the key and there's certainly a faction that is for lower taxes and not spending that was rather vocal in the last election, although they lost. They ran. They ran a slate of candidates in the last election and they lost and I assume that they will do the same this time. Will you be campaigning for a slate of candidates that fits more of your ideology? In addition to campaigning for mayor? Or are you going to let let it let go? What happens?

Joe Rasco:

I'm concerned about being the next mayor of Key Biscayne. And I'm going to focus on that. But but more importantly, I want to I want to go back to what you said, because it's really important. One of the things about being someone that is inherently totally involved with our 30 year past is that I can say to the people with a very clear face, and I can say, we did excellent projects, we bought the village green, we did the fire station, we did the police station, we did the community center, and all of these were financed, and there was no problem there was no issue. We were able to finance those projects. We were we didn't we didn't go bankrupt. We nobody, nobody had a problem. Taxes weren't raised. So we've got and I've got a track record to run on. And those are the projects that people should look at and say, hey, you know what, we have councils and we had a mayor that was very responsible, we should be able to trust them to do the same for the next 30 years.

Tony Winton:

One thing that wasn't so that happened, I believe, during that period was this other restriction that went into the village charter about development and density. Okay. And that's also on the ballot. Right, very contentious key. Biscayne has a really unusual provision that really prohibits the village council from doing anything, really, without getting a referendum vote, it came up most recently in a discussion about an assisted living facility, or it was brought forth by councilmember London and was shocked down really, almost as soon as it was brought up, that voters are going to be asked, Hey, listen, let the council decide to make density changes, if they have a supermajority. What's your position? I told you, you're in favor of all of these things, these things, but how would you get navigate that history?

Joe Rasco:

So So again, history, I think that my position has always been is we need to control the density. Okay. Now, can we just say no to everything going forward? Can Can we can we not look at properly how to set up an assisted living facility? Can Can we now look at some other things that people are going to bring forward? So again, I think this is a tool in the toolbox, we then change it, okay. We change it so that it becomes something that is usable, that that people can then look at and propose ideas. The council still has complete authority to deny the projects, if they don't, don't don't meet our criteria. But the

Tony Winton:

reason that one got put into the into the Charter, the first place was because people didn't trust government. They didn't trust the council. That was kind of the argument. Right? So I guess, how do you how do you overcome that?

Joe Rasco:

I wasn't I wasn't on that council. Right.

Tony Winton:

Right. But I mean, that's, that's why that that was a semester project. Right? That's essentially that's it, and that that restriction has remained in place, all this time. And we're in a mood, nationally, locally, where you've got this, you know, we just don't trust those folks on the day. So I mean, how do you? Do you just gonna say, Look at my track record? Is that is that the Oh? What assurances can you do beyond beyond that?

Joe Rasco:

Look, Tony, it's it's important that people have a say, okay, so having a say means that you have a mayor and a council that are willing to get input from the people, and the people provide the input on these kinds of projects, we can certainly have a great discussion about that. But what are we going to be afraid to have come conversations and discussions? Know that that is the role of our local government, the one that we fought for, and that we built? So let's have these discussions here. And this is the place to do so.

Thom Mozloom:

Let me broaden out the question a little bit so that we're not talking about one issue, but let's talk about a broader issue. You were mayor once before, what did you learn? And if elected this time, what will you do differently?

Joe Rasco:

Okay, um I had I had a very good experience as mayor. We we were able to do a lot of things, Tom, and there was opposition to some of the things that I undertook to do with with the team and the counselors that we had. And it was, it was a give and take war. What what I would do differently? Well, I don't know that I do a whole lot of things differently. Obviously, there are different types of ways to communicate, for example, now, this is a great way to use social media, which wasn't available to me when I was in the prior counsel. So I would say to you that a higher level of communication maybe would be a one thing that I see as a possibility that it's much easier to do now than it was in the past.

Tony Winton:

Well, we have so much when it gets you want to thank you. Our guest is Joe Rascoe, the former mayor of Key Biscayne who wants to be mayor again. And we will be back with a little more discussion on what are the issues what should voters care about with Joe Rascoe in just a minute?

Thom Mozloom:

And we are back on anti social here on ws qf 94.5 We go. FM beautiful Key Biscayne. I'm Thom Mozloom.

Tony Winton:

I'm Tony Winton.

Thom Mozloom:

And our our guest is Joe Rasco, whom I've termed that I believe I called you the ones in future mayor, at our last sit down, I think I'm gonna stick with that title for a while. Is that alright, was

Tony Winton:

completely objective, we should say the ones and want to be future mayor.

Thom Mozloom:

So to be to be determined,

Tony Winton:

determined future mayor. Okay.

Thom Mozloom:

So I, you know, we close with, you know, what did you do last time? And had you learn from that? What would you do different? Obviously, there were some, you know, in this race, given your other candidates that are running, and given your statement in the Islander quite frankly, you stated you brought the issue of ethics up. Use, you said that we need leaders who are effective and ethical. Can you expound more on that? What did you mean? And how are you setting yourself apart that way?

Joe Rasco:

Tom, it is in our DNA, the of the village that we created, there was a this is a local government. And we want people here that represent the best interest of our residents. And nothing more. And that's all I mean by it. I have a distinguished reputation, that's unsullied over the years that I served. And ever since then, also, and I'm, I'm ready, and Willie again, to serve. And I want to make sure that we have people that are going to look at what you were talking about the investments that we need to make whether there'll be 100 million or or plus, okay. And we got to make sure that the right people are making those decisions. That's it.

Thom Mozloom:

Okay, I don't want to put words in your mouth. But when I saw that term, and I looked at the other two people who are running, I immediately thought hmm, there's some ethnic issues in their past. And I was wondering if you were going to bring that up and run on that particular point. But it sounds like no,

Joe Rasco:

I'm running on my record, and I'm running on what I'm going to do in the future.

Tony Winton:

Right. One issue that's going to be probably front and center already is and we that's why we broke broke, because it's going to need its own little segment, which is the Rickenbacker the Rickenbacker Causeway, you know, it's just something that you know, what can I tell you it every day, there's a new wrinkle, the most recent one, the city of Miami may be taking a position finally redoing their position again, but it was it's been postponed. The county out there, Mr. Diskimage and plan Z. They're lobbying to try and have that project revived. There is a project underway to redo the bear cut bridge and then does it expand to include the causeway one of your I guess, I shouldn't say this. There's been a discussion by some people that Key Biscayne should somehow make its own bid somehow and and build its own beat be a big player. What do you what do you think are the next steps for the Rickenbacker?

Joe Rasco:

Tony, that's a great question number one We talk about bear cub bridge. Okay. And the way that I would like to continue to talk about bear cub bridge is that it brings in the rest of the Rickenbacker. I think that we need to do a master plan that starts from the toll to our city limits. And I think that that master plan then says to everyone, all the stakeholders that this is a chance to get this thing, right. Okay, the bridge, if we just replaced the bridge and make it flat, it probably won't serve us good. Well, for the next 5075 talking about the bear cut right now, I'm talking about the America right now. But But again, part of this is what's known as the NEPA process, and the NEPA process takes into account all the stakeholders, and the NEPA process is necessary if we're going to get federal dollars, which is something I know how to do.

Tony Winton:

Well, the NEPA process is going to happen whether or not it's private or privatization or whether it's a purely government project, right. It's a federal requirement. What what what do you think

Joe Rasco:

I think that we should undertake the project with the County, the county is the owner of this causeway, and we need to work with them and insert our important points to make sure that they are taken into consideration and doing a master plan doing this NEPA process, we get a shot at doing that. And that's what we need to do.

Tony Winton:

Do you think that's happening now with the initiative? The manager Steve Williamson has got we already have a plan being developed conceptual drawing should be ready in a couple of months. Yes,

Joe Rasco:

that means that we are taking a forward looking position and we're not reacting to what's going to be thrown at us. So by us being part of the process, we get to have a bigger say,

Tony Winton:

are you happy with the changes? One last question, Tom, with the with the immediate safety issues, lowering the speed limit that the county has issued? We're hearing that there might there's some additional measures as soon to be announced? That could involve though handling the peloton is a different way? What do you think about all of that?

Joe Rasco:

We need to separate vehicles and cyclist. I think that this is a this is a transportation corridor first and foremost. And then it has an adjacent linear park. And we need to keep those two apart. And anything that we do in that regard is going to be positive for both cyclists and for our residents who absolutely have to get on and off from Key Biscayne.

Thom Mozloom:

The county has a long and storied history of completely ignoring key this game and they have some bright spots of actually listening to them. How as mayor, would you inject Key Biscayne into this conversation in a meaningful way rather than scraping and kicking simply for attention?

Joe Rasco:

Well, Tom, as you know, I spent 17 years in Miami Dade County, and so I have good relationships. They're very positive relationships that I have built over the period of time. And those will serve us well to get us a seat at the table. And that's what we need to do we need to have a seat at the table. I think that Commissioner Regalado is is an ally, that we will absolutely rely on. Yes. And she, she is in our corner, and she understands our issue. So we will definitely have that. Plus, you know, all the other folks that I know on the on the board and also in throughout staff,

Tony Winton:

I want to come back to this thing because other other folks in MIT perhaps even some of your opponents who react when asked this question should keep his game try to partner with another big firm, a competitor to the disco as a group, if it's a p3 Because everything I'm hearing is p3 is the fast way to get this done and not not going in a p3 route could take years and years and years.

Joe Rasco:

Tony, my preference is not to privatize this causeway and to keep it as an asset and a resource for all of Miami Dade County.

Tony Winton:

And in terms of tolls, or other investments that keep his game, residents might be asked to pay well listen, you know your island is not generating anywhere near what it cost to run this this thing, especially not a new one. What's your what's your reaction to that?

Joe Rasco:

Well, if we have to pay our fair share, we will look at it that time I think that you know what will a cyclist put forward? You know, I think that that's a discussion also we need to have

Thom Mozloom:

changing topics. Let's have a conversation about crime for a minute. It's been really a big issue on Key Biscayne. It's been in the headlines a couple of times there have been some pretty interesting things going on on the key. Where do you stand on finding a way to crack down on some of the petty crime and solve some of the larger ones, what is your stance on policing? And what what steps the village can do to take what is one of the safest places in the county and make it even safer?

Joe Rasco:

Tom? Great question. That's one of the five points that I enumerated. And I think that community policing is very important, I see that the chief is starting to move us more and more in that direction. I saw some officers on a bike recently. Community policing means that a bigger interchange A bigger presence for our police force and our residents to have an opportunity to talk. And crime prevention is something that I think that we need to develop, I think that it's something that that our chief can do. And it means that people are not afraid of their police. And we should continue to fund our policing in a way that allows them to do things like that, for example, cyber crimes, that's probably an area that's going to continue to be an issue for all residents. That's something that we need to be out in front of. And I know that they have begun in that direction. And I'm going to support them to continue to take on measures that will help to reduce crime, and to have a a better connection between our police officers and our residents.

Thom Mozloom:

All right, the wants and want to be again, Mayor of Key Biscayne, Joe Roscoe, you have 90 seconds to make your closing argument, why you Why not anybody else, and what makes you the guy we should be voting for?

Joe Rasco:

Well, Tony, Tom, thanks for this opportunity. We go back to our roots. And then what our roots are, is that we've built a fantastic local government, a local government that is responsive to the people that was built by the people. This is something that what you see in me is decades of public service to my community. I have been in the trenches from the very beginning. And I continue to be working towards getting us things like we've been talking about whether it be rocking back, or whether it be a bare cut bridge, whether it be crime prevention, whether it be street flooding, whether it be our educational institutions and making them better, and our circular our circulation and our traffic issues on crime and Boulevard. These things need to be addressed. And I set the groundwork so that we've had a very good 30 years, and I'm looking forward to working with the President to do the same thing in the next 30 years. I won't be heading this government for 30 years, thankfully. But certainly it would be my honor to serve you and I ask for your vote. It's very important that everyone get out to vote for the primary, the primaries just 60 days away. So thank you very much and look forward to continuing conversations.

Tony Winton:

Thank you. And actually the primary will start sooner than that because mail ballots are going out really soon. The first overseas ballots will be going out July 9, and then July 21. Ballots are mailed out so we're actually just a few weeks away from the voting starting if you can believe it, just how fast this is happening. Joe Rascoe, former mayor of Key Biscayne running for that post again, you're on the ballot thank you for being our guest on antisocial and we will be back after this you're gonna leave it there and we are back live on W SQF 94.5 FM blink radio Key Biscayne. This is antisocial. I'm Tony Winton. And my co host is taking a stretch but I don't see him where is he now

Thom Mozloom:

I'm here I'm here. I'm here. I'm here just like I've lost our audio of our I'm here. Hear me now.

Tony Winton:

Now. Is that the seventh inning stretch you were doing?

Thom Mozloom:

Yes, I was I was in seventh no actually I was in Happy Hour mode. I'm getting ready to drink Joe, Joe's a good guest, we should have him when the campaign is over, depending on what happens, we should have him in the slot to co host when one of us isn't available, he's gone man to the issues.

Tony Winton:

And there are so many issues here. And you know, we have, as you point out the beginning of the show national, huge national stories happening all over the place. This has been one of these incredibly busy weeks, nationally. And then of course, internationally, you know, and let's not forget, there's a huge war going on in Europe. An oil prices and inflation in the economy and, you know, hours and hours of shows. But locally, this is really everyone's opportunity to really plug into, you know, bread and butter issues that will affect you in so many direct and immediate ways. And so I hope that folks spread the word about the show, all of the candidates will be on next week, vows to Gomez will be our guest on this program. And we're working on identifying a debate very soon at here at crossbridge. Church. The date has not been locked down yet, but it will be we're hoping to be sometime in July and will be able to give you a in person opportunity to see these candidates before the votes are tallied in the primary.

Thom Mozloom:

Yeah, so Tony, do we want to jump to happy hour? Is it time for that right now?

Tony Winton:

segment, but I think it's with all the issues and the fact that the mayor was working?

Thom Mozloom:

Do you want to talk about guns and abortion because I don't really I just want to I just want to drink it was really all I want to do.

Tony Winton:

Other than to note that I mean, on top of that, you know, you have these major rulings from the from the US Supreme Court that have that are going to change in many views the the legal landscape, the political landscape. It's already started the President saying today that roe is on the ballot, in a national address into proposals already being introduced to pass a national law that would set parameters on abortion rights. You know, it's going to be a continuing issue and then guns, you know, today the house agreeing to Senate language a breakthrough really the first major gun control legislation and decades. And the interesting news that our member of Congress who represents Key Biscayne, Maria Elvira Salazar actually a handful only 14 Democrat Republicans voted for it. She was among the 14 along with Republicans like Mr. Kinzinger and Liz Cheney, a small group of Republicans voting in favor of that so you know, a lot of things happening on the national level and and really kind of devotes a whole show, both of all the candidates running for federal office have said they're gonna come on the show, and Tom, you and I just have, we're not gonna have enough shows that we're gonna

Joe Rasco:

run out of coverwallet stuff,

Thom Mozloom:

and we're gonna we are we're gonna have to, we're gonna have to do more shows, and maybe, you know, podcast, most of them and, you know, maybe do an after show that isn't live on the radio. We're gonna have to work something out. We're open to discussions. If you have if you have an idea, you know, hit us up, slide into my DMs and let us know. I mean, here's what's interesting, though, about all of the issues that we're talking about. You and I differ politically, and sometimes sharply on these issues, yet, we can have civil conversations about them, and come to some logical paths forwards as with our relationship, none of what we're talking about needs to end relationships. And I think that's really the most important part about what we're going through it for, for us at the local level to continue to repeat these issues, while challenging are not relationship ending and should not be

Tony Winton:

it's a I think that if you're looking at the fabric of democratic process, no, there are undercurrents that are, I think troublesome and they are connected. So that's the question is, Can will this be a moment where the How should I say the guardrails the emergency collision avoidance system kicks in it seemed to be going pivoting to the January 6 hearings that are going on where members of the Justice Department Republicans all stood up and said, No, we're not going to violate our oaths. Were the Speaker of the House of a state said no, I'm not going to violate my oath. I'll vote for you again, even but I'm not going to violate my oath. It seems that the guardrails are in place that are put in place for those reasons are holding up. And so that's what everyone's watching.

Thom Mozloom:

Yeah, I think it to be esoteric about it. Let's hope Jefferson was right. Because that's I think you're heading into a, you're moving into a Jeffersonian age, and shifting out of a Hamiltonian ad. And let's hope Jefferson was right.

Tony Winton:

More or it could be that, you know, the question there was, you know, I think one of the founders who says what do we have a republic if you can keep it? Yeah, that's, that's also on the table, whether it's Hamiltonian or Jeffersonian at all is really, is it going to remain a republic is also a question.

Thom Mozloom:

Why don't we have the music? It's the end of the world. Oh, that one? Yeah. Well, how can we don't have that queued up for this conversation?

Tony Winton:

There we go. Your wish is my command, sir. You know, you're a TV news guy. Isn't this like your equivalent of Shark Week?

Thom Mozloom:

I feel fine, Tony.

Tony Winton:

You're boring.

Thom Mozloom:

That's actually I'm rather Zen about all of it. I really am. I think it's going to be fine. I think we're going to be okay. But I have started happy hour in case in case nobody heard me pour my drink. It's actually in my cup. I'm breaking out of a plastic hotel cup in my sad.

Tony Winton:

Really, really classy.

Thom Mozloom:

Yeah, well, matches my own standards. Quite frankly, I am no Key Biscayner. I can assure you that you're drinking by Jack Daniels. laughs That's not standard

Tony Winton:

for sweets. That's not standard formality. That wraps up our show this week. We we have some other pretty big items pending in the Key Biscayne independent that you'll be reading about. We have the coming up the first budget hearing that we alluded to in the show, and we'll be covering that listen, a lot of big decisions to make for this island. And of course, the election that we're going to continue to roll on, we had two more candidates announced already for the Village Council. So we have three newcomers who are in the race. And we expect additional announcements of course as we go along, and we'll keep everyone apprised of that. But for now, this is brings us to the end. So I'm happy for the signup. We don't have will so I can't do sign up. We can't

Thom Mozloom:

do sign out music. But listen, these are the types of things you're only going to hear here. So you know, the fact that we're we're actively organizing a debate among candidates on Key Biscayne. We are seeking funding for that right now. We have some lined up. It's expensive what you're what we're doing. It takes a lot of time to cover the news on Key Biscayne if this is important to you, if it's as important to you as it is to us. We would appreciate you going on to KB independent.org and hitting the donate now button. Remember we are invested we would like you to invest with us in your community.

Tony Winton:

Very well said Thom Thank you

Thom Mozloom:

I'm the marketing guy

Tony Winton:

for anti social I am Tony Winton.

Thom Mozloom:

I'm Thom Mozloom. Be safe everybody.